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PRESS STATEMENT ON 2018 FARM BILL

PRESS STATEMENT ON 2018 FARM BILL

By | December 11th, 2018 | FPA Blogs & News, Press Releases, Press Releases - Food Policy Action |


Food Policy Action Executive Director Monica Mills released the following statement on the 2018 Farm Bill:

“The conferees for the 2018 Farm Bill have come together to deliver a bipartisan bill. Great work was done across the aisle—especially by Senators Pat Roberts (R-KS) and Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and Rep. Collin Peterson (D-MN-07)—as they and other leaders pushed back on the mean-spirited work requirements in the House version, protected most environmental programs, and permanently funded Local Agriculture Market Programs and other programs for beginning farmers, organic farmers, and certain Tribal provisions.”


For Immediate release: December 11, 2018 CONTACT: Monica Mills, 202-365-6696   PRESS STATEMENT ON 2018 FARM BILL Food Policy Action is Satisfied...

For Immediate release: December 11, 2018
CONTACT: Monica Mills, 202-365-6696

 

PRESS STATEMENT ON 2018 FARM BILL

Food Policy Action is Satisfied with Final Bill Out of Conference Committee

WASHINGTON – Food Policy Action Executive Director Monica Mills released the following statement on the 2018 Farm Bill:

“The conferees for the 2018 Farm Bill have come together to deliver a bipartisan bill. Great work was done across the aisle—especially by Senators Pat Roberts (R-KS) and Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and Rep. Collin Peterson (D-MN-07)—as they and other leaders pushed back on the mean-spirited work requirements in the House version, protected most environmental programs, and permanently funded Local Agriculture Market Programs and other programs for beginning farmers, organic farmers, and certain Tribal provisions. These are big steps. Some really awful riders were eliminated in conference. Unfortunately, however, in Title I, commodity payments remain skewed to the largest and wealthiest farmers.

“In our analysis of six years of votes by House members, An Eater’s Guide to Congress, the data is clear that issues around food have become even more partisan than ever before. There has been a systematic strategy in the House to oppose policies that might create a more balanced food system. These strategies were not acceptable to us and we’re really happy they weren’t acceptable to the conferees.

“The Farm Bill should really be called the Food Bill because it affects everything that gets to our plates. It should provide healthy, safe, affordable food for everyone ensuring that healthy food is not a luxury. A tomato should not cost more than a package of cookies at a convenience store—as it does today. We’re not there yet. Strong, bipartisan efforts went into this final version to protect hungry families, preserve our environment, and strengthen local food programs. While not ideal, these all make for a farm bill that makes great strides forward.”

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Hungry And Afraid — Take Action! Part 3

Hungry And Afraid — Take Action! Part 3

By | December 3rd, 2018 | Blogs, FPA Blogs & News |

!

There is still time to make your voice heard! By law, the federal government must consider and respond to comments from the public when they propose new rules. This is your chance to let them know that this misguided rule takes the health of our country’s families in the wrong direction.

The comment deadline is December 10. There are only 7 more days to take action, so submit your comment today!


There is still time to make your voice heard! By law, the federal government must consider and respond to comments from the public when they propose new ru...

There is still time to make your voice heard! By law, the federal government must consider and respond to comments from the public when they propose new rules. This is your chance to let them know that this misguided rule takes the health of our country’s families in the wrong direction.

The comment deadline is December 10. There are only 7 more days to take action, so submit your comment today! And, if you’ve never submitted a comment before, you can see examples from other anti-hunger voices here.

Remember, it’s more effective to make your comments personal by sharing why you care about the impact of this proposed rule, and any stories of how it has affected you personally. You can use the following information to emphasize the importance of early childhood nutrition to lifelong health and productivity, for instance:

Make your voice heard! Engaging in the comment process is one of the most important ways that you can shape policies. After you’ve commented, please let your friends and family know, and share on social media, so that they can take action, too!

Hungry And Afraid — Immigrant Families a Public Charge? Part 2

Hungry And Afraid — Immigrant Families a Public Charge? Part 2

By | November 30th, 2018 | Blogs, FPA Blogs & News |

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In addition to the rhetoric against immigrants by the Trump administration, they have also proposed troubling changes to 100-year-old immigration rules. U.S. immigration laws have long denied permanent residence to immigrants who cannot support themselves; who become a “public charge.” The Trump administration plans to expand this definition as they decide whether immigrants will get long-term residency–a sharp change from the current system that weighs factors such as whether immigrants have family who are already permanent U.S. residents.


In addition to the rhetoric against immigrants by the Trump administration, they have also proposed troubling changes to 100-year-old immigration rules. U....

In addition to the rhetoric against immigrants by the Trump administration, they have also proposed troubling changes to 100-year-old immigration rules. U.S. immigration laws have long denied permanent residence to immigrants who cannot support themselves; who become a “public charge.” The Trump administration plans to expand this definition as they decide whether immigrants will get long-term residency–a sharp change from the current system that weighs factors such as whether immigrants have family who are already permanent U.S. residents. Under this proposed rule, an immigrant’s visa application could be denied for something as simple as having a large family to support or using social services for food assistance or health care. The current interpretation of “public charge” already includes cash assistance, like cash welfare, to weigh whether the applicant will be solely dependent on the government for income.

Legal immigrant families, even those whose children are U.S. citizens, would now have to worry that seeking food assistance or access to medical care could be used as grounds to deport them from the U.S. forcing a heartbreaking and inhumane choices like whether or not to keep families together or to allow their children to remain in the U.S. without them.

Because most immigrants aren’t eligible for public benefits until they have had green cards for five years, advocates are concerned that even if the new rule only applies to a few people, the chilling effect will discourage poor immigrant families from seeking food and health care for their children and themselves.

What can you do to stop this plan in its tracks? Stay tuned for our next post!

Eligible But Afraid — Immigrant Families and Food Assistance

Eligible But Afraid — Immigrant Families and Food Assistance

By | November 28th, 2018 | FPA Blogs & News |

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Fewer immigrant mothers of young children are receiving food assistance, even if they are eligible, new research reports . A new study of low-income mothers of children four and younger found a 10% drop in food assistance since 2017 for families who had been in the U.S. for less than five years.


Fewer immigrant mothers of young children are receiving food assistance, even if they are eligible, new research reports . A new study of low-income mothe...

Fewer immigrant mothers of young children are receiving food assistance, even if they are eligible, new research reports . A new study of low-income mothers of children four and younger found a 10% drop in food assistance since 2017 for families who had been in the U.S. for less than five years.

The study didn’t determine the reason that fewer families with young children are getting assistance, but child health advocates are concerned that fear among immigrant families is behind the drop–they are not applying for the food assistance they need. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, “good nutrition during pregnancy and childhood decreases the risk of prematurity, fetal or infant death, anemia and subsequent obesity and other chronic illnesses.” Nutritional deficiencies during pregnancy and the first two years of a child’s life can harm brain development and function for the rest of their lives.

This is one of the reasons that a proposed rule change by the Trump Administration troubles public health, nutrition, and early childhood advocates. For many years, U.S. immigration laws have denied permanent residence to immigrants who would be unlikely to support themselves and would become “public charges.” The Trump Administration’s proposal would massively expand this definition, encompassing not only cash welfare assistance, but also food assistance and health care. Immigrant families, even those whose children are U.S. citizens, are already facing the choice between accessing needed food assistance or medical care, or possibly being deported.  This rule change would only force more impossible choices for these families.

You can learn more about the study from Politico and New Food Economy.

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Our mission is to highlight the importance of food policy and to promote policies that support healthy diets, reduce hunger at home and abroad, improve food access and affordability, uphold the rights and dignity of food and farm workers, increase transparency, improve public health, reduce the risk of food-borne illness, support local and regional food systems, protect and maintain sustainable fisheries, treat farm animals humanely and reduce the environmental impact of farming and food production. Food Policy Action promotes positive policies through education and publication of the National Food Policy Scorecard.

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